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@Mike Martins Channel

there Gonna Ban Vitamin Supplements #bansuppliments

Link to tonight's show

https://odysee.com/@MikeMartins:7/MikeintheNighte371:2



1. Supplements come in many forms.

“Whether in pill, powder or liquid form, the goal of dietary supplements is often the same: to supplement your diet to get enough nutrients and enhance health,” explains Jeffrey Millstein, MD, physician at Penn Internal Medicine Woodbury Heights.


They contain at least one dietary ingredient, such as vitamins, minerals, herbs, botanicals, amino acids or enzymes.

Link to tonight's show

https://odysee.com/@MikeMartins:7/MikeintheNighte371:2



1. Supplements come in many forms.

“Whether in pill, powder or liquid form, the goal of dietary supplements is often the same: to supplement your diet to get enough nutrients and enhance health,” explains Jeffrey Millstein, MD, physician at Penn Internal Medicine Woodbury Heights.


They contain at least one dietary ingredient, such as vitamins, minerals, herbs, botanicals, amino acids or enzymes. Some of the most popular supplements come in a multivitamin (which can help you avoid taking a dozen pills each day), but they can also be purchased as a standalone supplement.


The simplest common denominator? They’re labeled as dietary supplements. Some common dietary supplements include:


Calcium

Fish oil

Echinacea

Ginseng

Garlic

Vitamin D

St. John’s wort

Green tea

2. Some supplements are effective, while others are not.

There’s a reason supplements are so popular: sometimes, they work.


“In addition to a healthy diet, there is evidence that some supplements can benefit your overall well-being with little to no risk,” says Dr. Millstein.


Common supplements that may benefit your health include:


Vitamin B12, which can help keep nerve and blood cells healthy, make DNA and prevent anemia

Folic acid, which can reduce birth defects when taken by pregnant women

Vitamin D, which can strengthen bones

Calcium, which can promote bone health

Vitamins C and E, which can prevent cell damage

Fish oil, which can support heart health

Vitamin A, which can slow down vision loss from age-related macular degeneration

Zinc, which can promote skin health and slow down vision loss from age-related macular degeneration

Melatonin, which can help counteract jet lag

However, despite the amount of research that’s been done on supplements (since 1999, the National Institutes of Health has spent more than $2.4 billion studying vitamins and minerals), scientific evidence isn’t completely clear. Keep in mind: Most studies suggest that multivitamins won’t make you live longer, slow cognitive decline or lower your chances of disease, such as heart disease, cancer or diabetes.


“In fact, it’s illegal for companies to make claims that supplements will treat, diagnose, prevent or cure diseases,” says Dr. Millstein.


Also, the products you buy in stores or online may be different from those used in studies, so studies may be misleading.


3. Supplements aren’t always safe.

In most cases, multivitamins aren’t likely to pose any health risks. Still, it’s important to be cautious when you put anything in your body.


Dr. Millstein explains, “Supplements may interact with other medications you’re taking or pose risks if you have certain medical conditions, such as liver disease, or are going to have surgery. Some supplements also haven’t been tested in pregnant women, nursing mothers or children, and you may need to take extra precautions.”


Also, federal regulations for dietary supplements are less strict than prescription drugs. Some supplements may contain ingredients not listed on the label, and these ingredients can be unsafe. Certain products are marketed as dietary supplements and actually contain prescription drugs within them — drugs that are not allowed in dietary supplements.


Some supplements that may pose risks include:


Vitamin K, which can reduce the effectiveness of blood thinners

Gingko, which can increase blood thinning

St. John’s wort, which can make some drugs, such as antidepressants and birth control, less effective

Herbal supplements comfrey and kava, which can damage your liver

Beta-carotene and vitamin A, which can increase the risk of lung cancer in smokers

4. Speak with your healthcare provider before taking any supplements.

“The most important thing to remember is to be smart when choosing a supplement,” says Dr. Millstein.


Your first step should be discussing your options with your healthcare provider, since a supplement’s effectiveness and safety may depend on you

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