Home Recommended Explore Explore Videos Explore Livestreams Explore Images Explore Audio Explore Topics Explore Users Explore groups Topics Groups About Features & roadmap Airtime extension Membership & xp moderation Community guidelines Airtime a short history imprint Contact us changelog

@EricDubay

How the Midnight Sun Works on Flat Earth

The Midnight Sun is a phenomenon experienced by observers North of the Arctic circle during Summer Solstice where the Sun can be seen circling over and around 360 degrees without ever setting. Depending how far North the observer is, the Sun can be seen for several days/weeks, rising and falling as usual but never fully setting beyond the horizon. This is because the Sun having reached the Tropic of Cancer is making its tightest, narrowest circle over the Earth, so much so th

The Midnight Sun is a phenomenon experienced by observers North of the Arctic circle during Summer Solstice where the Sun can be seen circling over and around 360 degrees without ever setting. Depending how far North the observer is, the Sun can be seen for several days/weeks, rising and falling as usual but never fully setting beyond the horizon. This is because the Sun having reached the Tropic of Cancer is making its tightest, narrowest circle over the Earth, so much so that observers positioned centrally within the Arctic circle are never at any time significantly far enough away from the Sun for it to set beyond their horizon. Not until after Summer Solstice when the Sun makes its way back towards the equator will the Sun set completely and Arctic days begin getting shorter. Meanwhile in the Antarctic during Summer Solstice, the Sun disappears completely for over 2 months leaving everyone below the Antarctic circle in bitter cold darkness from mid-May to mid-July. Again, this is because the Sun narrowing and tightening its path towards the Tropic of Cancer means it has moved significantly far enough away from the Antarctic perimeter so as not to be seen by observers positioned so far South. Not until mid-July when the Sun expands and widens its path back significantly far enough will Antarctic observers again be able to see the Sun above the horizon and the Antarctic days begin getting longer.


In order to fit the heliocentric globe model, this Midnight Sun phenomenon must also occur for observers South of the Antarctic circle during Winter Solstice. Depending how far South the observer is, the Sun should be seen for several days/weeks never fully setting just like it does in the North. In reality, however, there is never 24 hour sunlight anywhere in Antarctica at any time of year. During Winter Solstice when the Sun is circling its widest path over and around the Tropic of Capricorn, observers far enough South will experience extended daylight hours due to proximity with the Sun, but will still observe it to rise and set beyond the horizon completely every single day. In fact, this is why the Arctic and Antarctic climates are so strikingly dissimilar, because of the drastically different amount of sunlight received by each. Based on the heliocentric globe model, both the Arctic and Antarctic receive comparable amounts of sunlight every year, and so should have comparable temperatures, seasonal changes, and ability to sustain plant/animal life, but in reality differ greatly in these ways.


Antarctica is by far the coldest place on Earth with an average annual temperature of approximately -57 degrees Farenheit, and a record low of -135.8! The average annual temperature at the North Pole, however, is a comparatively warm 4 degrees. Throughout the year, temperatures in the Antarctic vary less than half the amount at comparable Arctic latitudes. The Northern Arctic region enjoys moderately warm summers and manageable winters, whereas the Southern Antarctic region never even warms enough to melt the perpetual snow and ice. The island of Kerguelen at 49 degrees Southern latitude has only 18 species of native plants that can survive its hostile climate. Compare this with the island of Iceland at 65 degrees Northern latitude, 16 degrees further North of the equator than Kerguelen is South, yet Iceland is home to 870 species of native plants. On the Isle of Georgia, just 54 degrees Southern latitude, the same latitude as Canada or England in the North, where dense forests of various tall trees abound, the infamous Captain Cook wrote that he was unable to find a single shrub large enough to make a toothpick! In the Arctic there are 4 clearly distinguished seasons, warm summers, and an abundance of plant and animal life, none of which can be said of the Antarctic. The Eskimo live as far North as the 79th parallel, whereas in the South no native man is found higher than the 56th.


Since this one fact would destroy the heliocentric g

Views:76
Likes:0
PostTime:1623245590647
Comment Count:0
Group Name:
Votes Count:1